What I am Reading Now

Currently reading a Martin Cruz Smith book Polar Star set during the cold war period on a Soviet fishing factory ship.  He is a terrific writer and you will feel like you are there (and you’ll cringe).  Would call this one a literary mystery.  It is a sequel to his earlier Gorky Park (both written in the 80’s).

 

18 thoughts on “What I am Reading Now

  1. Started Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn – very different from my last book. Got lots of press when it came out in June. Described as: With her razor-sharp writing and trademark psychological insight, Gillian Flynn delivers a fast-paced, devilishly dark, and ingeniously plotted thriller that confirms her status as one of the hottest writers around.

  2. Just started Tana French’s latest – Broken Harbor. She does something interesting for a series. Instead of focusing on a single character, she looks at the Murder Squad and each of her books (In the Woods – Faithful Place) features a different detective from the squad. Headed to the patio for a Sunday afternoon of good mystery reading.

    • Finished Broken Harbor and thought it was well worth reading. Probably not a good choice for people who prefer their mysteries of the puzzle variety – this one was much more influenced by the life of the policeman doing the investigation and the current economic conditions.

      • Who will the next detective be? One great thing about this series is you don’t need to read the books in order. I really liked Faithful Place and this is another good case for audio books. The Irish accent of the narrator transported me right back to Dublin!

  3. Mentioned earlier that I was inspired by the Longmire series on A&E to read the books by Craig Johnson that the series is based on. Thought the series was fine but I like the books much better – more of the relationships and the humor between the principals. Have read my way up to the last in the series. Last one I read was Hell’s Empty. Native American mysticism is a factor in several of the books – it is a major character in this one. I really like the Longmire character but I have a couple quibbles with the author. Longmire (who is a Sheriff and should know better) is the male equivalent of the young woman alone in the house who knows a murder suspect is on the loose and hears a noise in the basement and decides to investigate. He often takes very foolish chances and Johnson is about an inch and a half from making him a superhero since no matter what happens to him – and lots does – he always survives. But in spite of the quibbles, I have really enjoyed this series and am trying to avoid reading the last one – which I have on my NOOK – since I know it will be a while before another one is available.

  4. Just getting started on a Michael Stanley – Death of the Mantis. He writes about a detective in Botswana but has a different take on the country than Alexander McCall Smith with his No. 1 Detective Agency series.

    • Dottie MacKeen says:

      Book was really interesting in its look at what happens to indigenous people when their culture is taken from them and is also a look at friendship and betrayal.

      • Dottie MacKeen says:

        And for a book that is in some ways the direct opposite of the one set in the Kalahari, White Heat shares with the Death of the Mantis an exploration of a mostly unknown culture and a dangerously forbidding area. There is a mystery – unscrupulous oil companies, venal politicians, a wide range of addictions and derelict policemen – but the character of Edie Kiglatuk – half Inuit and half outsider – who lives in the Arctic circle and loves it – is the best thing about the book. The descriptions of the cold and ice are as riveting as the descriptions of the heat and sand in the Kalahari and in both books, the local people are watching their culture disappear. Author of White Heat is M. J. McGrath who wrote an award winning non-fiction account of the Inuit.

  5. I just finished Bad Little Falls by Maine author Paul Doiron. His main character, Mike Bowditch, is a game warden who has been re-posted (for bad behavior) to Washington County, the poorest county in Maine, which is where I grew up. It was definitely fun to read about a familiar landscape. I always thought game wardens dealt more with game than human law enforcement, but maybe there’s a lot more co-operation than I knew.
    This is the third book in the series, and I will go back to read The Poacher’s Son (on my iPod) and Trespasser.

  6. Sally Thurston says:

    Just finished a very funny but thought-provoking book by Jeanne Ray called Calling Invisible Women. It’s about a woman who wakes up one morning to find she is invisible. Much to her dismay, her family members and even her family doctor don’t notice the difference! As she adjusts to her new state, she finds some allies and even feels empowered to make positive changes around her. There is a very funny riff on airport security in the post-9/11 world. Highly recommended for women of a certain age and the people who love them.

  7. Currently working on the latest Benjamin Black VENGEANCE. My mystery book group read the first in this series Christine Falls and we were kind of underwhelmed. Maybe because knowing that Benjamin Black is the pen name for award winning novelist John Banville we had very high expectations. I am liking this one better but again it’s not a standard puzzle kind of mystery – much more literary but we would expect nothing less of Banville.

  8. Finally getting to Fingersmith by Sarah Waters which has been on my to-read shelf for years. If you like Dickens, you’ll like this book – orphans, thief’s, country estates, insane asylums – very Victorian (although there is some thought that Dickens might have blushed at some of the sexual awareness.)

  9. Just finished Hank Phillippi Ryan’s latest – The Other Woman – which is getting good reviews and selling well for her. Is a more complicated plot than she has attempted in the past and I think it mostly works – kept me interested to the end.

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