WILL YOUR SUMMER READING MAKE YOUR SMARTER?

Flavorwire thinks they have 20 books (non-fiction) that will.  Check out the list and if you read one, let me know if your IQ jumped.

http://flavorwire.com/457770/summer-reading-20-new-nonfiction-books-that-will-make-you-smarter

I think I’ll try Perfectly Miserable by Sarah Payne Stuart.  Read her book about Robert Lowell several years ago and enjoyed it – My First Cousin Once Removed and The Year Roger Wasn’t Well (a not well  disguised book about WGBH)

LOOKING FORWARD TO MEETING SOME NEW AUTHORS AT THE LIBRARY

On Tuesday, May 13 we will finally be hosting Dina Keratsis with her book CAKE.

On June 3 we will be hosting two new authors – Elisabeth Elo whose mystery North of Boston has gotten raves – including two reviews in the GLOBE – and Holly Robinson who has several titles – the most recent being Beach Plum Island.  Holly tells me that she and Elisabeth have appeared together before and had a great time so I think it will be a delightful evening – and what’s better than finding new authors?

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DINA                                  ELISABETH                                              HOLLY

this is today’s rant

I am not sure what the rationale is but quite frequently when a book is coming out in paperback, all the copies of the hardcover are pulled from bookstores.  I assume they think no one will buy the hardcover when paper is available – which might be true.  But here’s the rant – they pull the hardcovers BEFORE they publish the paperback – sometimes weeks before so effectively the book is only available as an E-book for quite some time.  It was especially noticeable this week when local mystery writer Hank Phillippi Ryan won the Agatha for her book The Wrong Girl.  The Agatha is a fairly prestigious fan award and you would normally expect a sales bump BUT they have pulled the hardcovers and the paperback won’t be out until July.

OK – I’m done.

WORLD BOOK NIGHT

Last week was World Book Night – the 3rd one in the US.  Every year publishers, authors, librarians, book stores, and volunteers work together to donate and distribute a half million new books to people who may not be avid readers.  April 23 (Shakespeare’s birthday I think) is the distribution day but several months before that date, a group of titles has been selected and volunteers are asked to apply to be a book giver.  The process is simple.  You fill out a simple form on-line saying what book you want to give (it should be one you have read and feel strongly about) and where you’ll be giving it out.  In a few weeks, you will get an e-mail telling you if you have been approved as a giver and you select a location where you want to pick up your books.  Both the Sudbury and Stow libraries are distribution locations in this area.  The week before World Book Night, you pick up your box of 20 copies of the book you requested and on World Book Night, you distribute them.  There can’t be anything nicer than being able to hand out a free copy of a book you love to someone who hasn’t had the pleasure of reading it.  If you’d like to be part of this next year, sign up for their newsletter at:

http://www.us.worldbooknight.org/how-do-i-get-involved/newsletter

A book I can’t wait to tell everyone about

I just finished a book that I really loved.  Main character is a cranky book seller on an island who – at the beginning of the story – is deep in grief over the death of his wife.   It is The Storied Life of A. J. Fikry by Gabrielle Zevin.

Compared to The Guernsey Literary and Potato Pie Society and The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fryit is a lovely book full of the joy of reading and the opportunity for second chances.  The book is worth reading just for the chapter introducing “reviews” by AJF.

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Is there a particular kind of book – or author – that always grabs your attention

for me – that’s southern writers.  Most of them are actually from the south or are writing about it – but what seems most “southern” about these authors to me is their ability to tell a story.  So when I saw this listing posted by Simon and Schuster on “50 best southern novels ever written”, I was hooked.  As is always the case I could argue about some of the choices but there’s a lot of good reading here.

http://flavorwire.com/448660/the-50-best-southern-novels-ever-written/view-all/

So what’s your reading soft touch?

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